Iranian Born Boy

Iranian Born Boy

First Passport Picture
Nathan's First Passport Picture

As I look back at the years of my adult life, I am kind of amazed at some of the things I have experienced.  Some might call me brave and adventurous, but others will consider my choices irresponsible and stupid!  And at any given time, I could agree with either of those opinions.

On February 2, 1977, I added another item to my list of adventures when I gave birth in the foreign (and I mean FOREIGN) country of Iran.   Call it crazy or call me courageous, we were thrilled to welcome a new little boy – even if he was considered a dual national for about 16 years.

This was the view from my hospital room – very foreign as were some of the procedures.

Sepahan Hospital - Isfahan, Iran
Sepahan Hospital - Isfahan, Iran

About two weeks before Nathan was born, Don and I went to a pharmacy, prescription from Dr. Shams in hand, and bought all of the supplies and medication I would need for labor and delivery.  We left the pharmacy with a bag filled with shots, pills, and IV materials, having spent only $9.00.  What a bargain!  Upon my arrival at the hospital, I handed over my bag of goodies to the attending nurse, and we were set.

Inside the hospital, my room was very typical and was cleaned regularly – like at all hours of the day and night.  However, the communal bathroom designated for my use was wa-a-a-a-a-y down the hall, and the broken toilet seat and blood on the floor made me question my sanity.  Why exactly did I decide not to return to Colorado to have this baby?

My room in Sepahan Hospital
My room in Sepahan Hospital
My doctor looks rather foreign, but was very competent.  And I just look bad!
Dr. Shams - Iranian obstetrician
Dr. Shams - Iranian obstetrician
Thousands of miles from Colorado and with no telephone service available, the only way to announce our newest arrival was with a telegram.
Announcing Nathan's arrival
Announcing Nathan's arrival

We wanted all the family to see how cute our little boy was.  So we sent lots of pictures and wished the grandmas could adore him in person.

Nathan - 6 hours old
Nathan - 6 hours old

Proud Daddy Don
Proud Daddy Don

While we were doing all the paperwork to be discharged from the hospital, Nate reached his limit and began crying almost inconsolably.  As I had made it very clear from the time I was checked into the hospital that this would be a bottle-fed baby, I asked one of the nurses to bring me a bottle for him.  Her response in broken English, “Oh, no missus.  You feed.”  I replied that I was not feeding, and hadn’t they been giving him bottles in the nursery?  Again the response, “Oh, no missus.  You feed.”  When I insisted, one of the staff finally showed up with a bottle that was so dirty it looked like it had been rolled through the “jube” or gutter.  The hole in the nipple was so large that when I tipped the bottle, the milk ran out of it in a steady stream.  Horrified, I set the bottle aside and decided that listening to Nathan scream was a far better alternative.  I refused to allow myself to wonder what he’d been fed in the nursery.

Heading home
Heading home

We were relieved to leave the hospital for the security of our own home, and felt that the Lord had truly taken care of both Nathan and Mom.

What a sweet welcoming committee awaited us.

Welcoming Nate to the family
Emily welcoming Nate to the family

Happy Birthday, Nate!

2 thoughts on “Iranian Born Boy

  1. Happy Birthday Nathan! I remember those days, through letters only, and was so impressed with my little sister’s bravery! You are one lucky man……..although you may at times have questioned your mom’s sanity! Those kind of experiences would not be possible in this day and time…..Yikes! I can hardly believe the start you had in this world. I remember Lynn telling me about the families of patients cooking food outside the hospital to take in to their family members. The whole “bathroom down the hall” and bringing your own supplies to the hospital freaked me out then, and still does! Auntie Yvonne

    Like

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